HOW DID WE DO IT?

Our professional tree climbers completed more than 100 hours of climbing during the project. Their experience, patience and love of the canopy enabled the team to access even the furtherest reaches of the canopy.

Our photography and film crew created more than 120,000 images, 1200 video clips and 28 epic time-lapse sequences during the production. The team's creative imagination really drove this production.

Our canopy scientists provided unparalleled scientific support and organisation to the team. Their talents and dedication to canopy science delivered several key elements to the production.

 

How we did it

Work commenced in Pureora Forest Park in early March 2015 and we were blessed to have a warm welcome from local iwi, who provided incredible support during our stay. The initial set up period was a lively time with eight of us working tirelessly to get all the equipment in place, including our main camera rig which took four professional tree climbers three days to install. The main camera rig ran the entire 40m height of the subject tree, which allowed us to take the series of photos that created the Rimu Portrait.

Setting up the main camera rig (MOE)

Setting up the main camera rig (MOE)

Another exciting aspect of the project was the unique time-lapse footage that we captured with interesting perspectives. We custom-designed a 50m long cable-cam that we suspended from various places in the forest. Using the Syrp Genie (ingenious hardware that moved the cable-cam platform along the cables) we were able to capture both time-lapse and video footage. The team went to incredible lengths to install the cable-cam into far reaching parts of the forest. It took three days to set up the cable-cam between the canopy of one emergent tree to another, 40m off the ground and covering a total span 35m!

The cable camera set up high in the canopy

The cable camera set up high in the canopy

We also interviewed scientists, protestors, former loggers and local iwi for our documentary that showcases the natural beauty and importance of the forest. This work shares the unique social history and ecological importance of Pureora, a forest not only rich in diversity and wildlife, but one that played a pivotal role in the conservation of forests all throughout New Zealand.

We had the most incredible time in Pureora Forest and would like to thank all of the amazing people who helped to make this project happen.